• 2009
    Aug
    27

    Kinkaku-ji (literally Temple of the Golden Pavilion), or formally Rokuon-ji (Deer Garden Temple) is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. The Golden Pavilion, or Kinkaku, is a three-story building on the grounds of the Rokuon-ji temple complex. The top two stories of the pavilion are covered with pure gold leaf. The pavilion functions as a shariden, housing relics of the Buddha (Buddha’s Ashes).

    Kinkaku-ji was originally built in 1397 to serve as a retirement villa for Shogun Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, as part of his estate then known as Kitayama. It was his son who converted the building into a Zen temple of the Rinzai school.

    In 1984, the coating of Japanese lacquer was found a little decayed, and a new coating as well as gilding with gold-leaf, much thicker than the original coatings (5/10,000mm instead of 1/10,000mm), was completed in 1987. Additionally, the interior of the building, including the paintings and Yoshimitsu’s statue, were also restored. Finally, the roof was restored in 2003.

    The top floor is built in traditional Chinese cha’an style, also known as zenshu-butsuden-zukuri; and the middle floor in the style of warrior aristocrats, or buke-zukuri. The ground floor is rendered in shinden-zukuri style, reminiscent of the residential style of the Heian imperial aristocracy. The building is often linked or contrasted with Ginkaku-ji (Silver Pavilion Temple), and Shōkoku-ji, which are also located in Kyoto.

    The Golden Pavilion is set in a magnificent Japanese strolling garden (kaiyū-shiki). The pond in front of it is called Kyōko-chi (Mirror Pond). There are many islands and stones on the pond that represent the Buddhist creation story.

    Kinkakuji has exquisite and beautiful Japanese garden. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.

    Kinkakuji has exquisite and beautiful Japanese garden. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.

    Kinkakuji has exquisite and beautiful Japanese garden. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.

    Kinkakuji has exquisite and beautiful Japanese garden. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.Kinkakuji be used gold leaf to decorative the building surface. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.

    Kinkakuji be used gold leaf to decorative the building surface. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.

    Kinkakuji be used gold leaf to decorative the building surface. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.

    Kinkakuji be used gold leaf to decorative the building surface. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.

    Kinkakuji be used gold leaf to decorative the building surface. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.

    Stone Buddha, many people donate coins to the Buddha. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.

    Stone Buddha, many people donate coins to the Buddha. Japan, Kyoto, summer vacation. Photo by KaKa.

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  • 2009
    Aug
    25

    Sumo is a competitive contact sport where a wrestler attempts to force another wrestler out of a circular ring or to touch the ground with anything other than the soles of the feet. The sport originated in Japan, the only country where it is practiced professionally.

    The Japanese consider sumo a gendai, though the sport has a history spanning many centuries. The sumo tradition is very ancient, and even today the sport includes many ritual elements, such as the use of salt for purification, from the days sumo was used in the Shinto religion.

    Life as a rikishi is highly regimented, with rules laid down by the Sumo Association. Professional sumo wrestlers are required to live in communal “sumo training stables” known in Japanese as heya where all aspects of their daily lives—from meals to their manner of dress—are dictated by strict tradition.

    KaKa is very fortunate to have the opportunity to try Japanese Sumo Hot Pot…Delicious!
    But after dinner,how about KaKa’s body size…

    The Sumo gymnasium in Tokoyo. Japan, Tokyo, Photo by KaKa

    The Sumo gymnasium in Tokoyo. Japan, Tokyo, Photo by KaKa

    Japanese sumo handworking, Japan, Tokyo, Photo by KaKa

    Japanese sumo handworking, Japan, Tokyo, Photo by KaKa

    Japanese sumo hot pot, Japan, Tokyo, Photo by KaKa

    Japanese sumo hot pot, Japan, Tokyo, Photo by KaKa

    Japanese sumo hot pot, Japan, Tokyo, Photo by KaKa

    Japanese sumo hot pot, Japan, Tokyo, Photo by KaKa

    Japanese sumo hot pot, Japan, Tokyo, Photo by KaKa

    Japanese sumo hot pot, Japan, Tokyo, Photo by KaKaYoung people who want to be Sumo wrestlers, Japan, Tokyo, Photo in sumo hot pot Restaurant.

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  • Japan, Tour and Vacation August 24, 2009 1 Comment
    2009
    Aug
    24

    Osaka Castle (大坂城・Osakajo) is a Japanese castle in Chūō-ku, Osaka, Osaka Prefecture, Japan.

    Originally called Ozakajō, it is one of Japan’s most famous castles, and played a major role in the unification of Japan during the sixteenth century of the Azuchi-Momoyama period. Osaka Castle is situated on a plot of land roughly one kilometer square. It is built on two raised platforms of landfill supported by sheer walls of cut rock, using a technique called Burdock piling, each overlooking a moat. The central castle building is five stories on the outside and eight stories on the inside, and built atop a tall stone foundation to protect its occupants from sword-bearing attackers.

    The Castle grounds, which cover approximately 60,000 square meters (15 acres) contain thirteen structures which have been designated as Important Cultural Assets by the Japanese government,  including the Toyokuni Shrine, dedicated to Toyotomi Hideyoshi.

    Tourists Ferry train to go to the Osaka Castle. Japan, Osaka, Photo by KaKa

    Tourists Ferry train to go to the Osaka Castle. Japan, Osaka, Photo by KaKa

    Tourists Ferry train to go to the Osaka Castle. Japan, Osaka, Photo by KaKa

    Tourists Ferry train to go to the Osaka Castle. Japan, Osaka, Photo by KaKa

    The majestic city wall and fosse of the Osaka Castle. Japan, Osaka, Photo by KaKa

    The majestic city wall and fosse of the Osaka Castle. Japan, Osaka, Photo by KaKa

    Osaka Castle, Japan, Osaka, summer, Photo by KaKa

    Osaka Castle, Japan, Osaka, summer, Photo by KaKa

    The majestic city wall and fosse of the Osaka Castle. Japan, Osaka, Photo by KaKa

    The majestic city wall and fosse of the Osaka Castle. Japan, Osaka, Photo by KaKa

    Osaka Castle, Japan, Osaka, summer, Photo by KaKa

    Osaka Castle, Japan, Osaka, summer, Photo by KaKa

    One of the city gate of Osaka Castle. Japan, Osaka, Osaka Castle, Photo by KaKa

    One of the city gate of Osaka Castle. Japan, Osaka, Osaka Castle, Photo by KaKa

    Osaka Castle, Japan, Osaka, summer, Photo by KaKa

    Osaka Castle, Japan, Osaka, summer, Photo by KaKa

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  • 2009
    Aug
    23

    KaKa like Japanese food very much.
    Japanese meals usually include many types of food in one meal, this is very healthy and delicious.
    Japanese food is more light than the Chinese food, not a lot of cooking oil inside.
    Pulled noodle, sahshimi, tempura, Japanese hot pot…KaKa like most of the Japanese food.

    Japanese set lunch at Nara Park Todaiji Temple. Japan, Nara, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese set lunch at Nara Park Todaiji Temple. Japan, Nara, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese hot pot set lunch at Nara Park Todaiji Temple. Japan, Nara, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese hot pot set lunch at Nara Park Todaiji Temple. Japan, Nara, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese hot pot set lunch at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese hot pot set lunch at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese tempura set lunch at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese tempura set lunch at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese pickles set supper at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese pickles set supper at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese pickles set supper at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese pickles set supper at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese pickles set supper at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese pickles set supper at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese sahshimi set supper at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese sahshimi set supper at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese steamed egg set supper at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

    Japanese steamed egg set supper at Lake Kawaguchi. Japan, Mount Fuji, Photo by KaKa.

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  • 2009
    Aug
    14

    Use your eyes to eat in Japan.
    Most Japanese restaurants have very strong window displays – food model, very vivid.
    The window art shows that, the Japanese people love and pay more attention on delicacy food.

    Japanese handwork, the image of noble women, Japan, Osaka, Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Japanese handwork, the image of noble women, Japan, Osaka, Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Restaurant window displays at Dotonbori in Osaka, Japan. Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Restaurant window displays at Dotonbori in Osaka, Japan. Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Restaurant window displays at Dotonbori in Osaka, Japan. Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Restaurant window displays at Dotonbori in Osaka, Japan. Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Restaurant window display Sushi, Dotonbori, Osaka, Japan, Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Restaurant window display Sushi, Dotonbori, Osaka, Japan, Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Long legs crab. Restaurant window displays at Dotonbori in Osaka, Japan. Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Long legs crab. Restaurant window displays at Dotonbori in Osaka, Japan. Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Pulled noodle window displays, Tokyo, Japan, Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Pulled noodle window displays, Tokyo, Japan, Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Pancake window displays at Shinsaibashi in Osaka, Japan. Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

    Pancake window displays at Shinsaibashi in Osaka, Japan. Photo by KaKa, http://kakanow.com

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